A Touching Story – BNA Bulletin – Autumn 2017

The Autumn 2017 edition of the BNA Bulletin (free to all British Neuroscience Association Members!) which has just landed on the doormats, in-trays and inboxes of over 2000 people features a 2 page article on C-Tactile fibres, touch, and the work of SomAffect / LJMU Professor Francis McGlone.

… “The fast nerves have dominated our understanding of touch” … “But that’s the boring stuff. The rest of the body, that’s where the C-tactile fibres are.” …


A touching story

C-tactile fibres in hairy skin, specialised for responding to gentle stroking, could be playing a key role in development of the social brain.


… “It doesn’t matter what story you tell, the nerve fibres have worked it out.” …


Download the Article (PDF): A Touching Story  and visit the British Neuroscience Association to sign up, and read the whole bulletin (plus back issues from 2004).

© The British Neuroscience Association Ltd

CTs & Microneurography in Moscow

As part of SomAffect’s developing collaboration with Anton Varlamov & Galina Protnova at the Russian Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, Francis McGlone & Adarsh Makdani were recently invited to help establish a Microneurography lab in Moscow.

 

 

The first series of experiments proved extremely promising, and included practice with ultrasound guided microneurography, and an encouraging trial experiment in a person with autism.

Professor McGlone was also invited to speak about C-Tactile Fibres, and the Social Touch Hypothesis, central to much of SomAffect’s work.

The lectures prompted engaging discussions between academics and practitioners, which we hope will be the springboard for a number of exciting research projects.

 

 

In autism brains, response to ‘social touch’ is altered

Research by SomAffect’s Francis McGlone appears in this month’s SFARI newsletter.

“The brains of people with autism respond differently to a gentle brush on the arm — a form of social touch — than do those of people without the disorder, according to a study published 5 June in Cerebral Cortex”

SFARI““I find it very exciting,” says Kamila Markram, Autism Project director at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne, who proposed the intense world theory in 2007. The new study supports the idea that sensory overload is a key biomarker of autism.”

Read the full article at sfari.org…

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Unseen agony: Dismantling autism’s house of pain – SFARI 05/15


David Moore recently spoke to Sarah DeWeerdt  for the Simons FoundationAutism Research Initiative, about pain & autism.

Unseen agony: Dismantling autism’s house of pain

“I was surprised by how little literature exists on autism and
pain,” says David Moore, senior lecturer in psychology at SFARI_MAY2015COVERLiverpool John Moores University in the U.K., who last year published a review of the field


Read the full article
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