Feel Better, Live More Podcast: Touch – The Forgotten Sense with Professor Francis McGlone

Since its launch in January 2018, Dr. Ranjan Chatterjee’s ‘Feel Better, Live More’ podcast has grown rapidly to become the Number 1 health podcast in the UK. It regularly tops the iTunes charts, has been downloaded over 2 million times. The latest episode (#45), released on 16/01/2019, features SomAffect’s Francis Read more…

Stroking modulates noxious-evoked brain activity in human infants (Current Biology – 17/12/18)

Just published, and already making headlines, is our new open-access paper in Current Biology. SomAffect’s Francis McGlone and Susannah Walker (LJMU) have been working closely in collaboration with Rebecca Slater’s lab (University of Oxford) on this study which shows that stroking touch reduces infant neural (EEG) responses to pinpricks & clinical Read more…

Professor Francis McGlone: How do you feel? – Roche NeuroSense

In November 2017, the pharmaceutical company Roche hosted NeuroSense, an event that aimed to “explore the way the brain uses the five senses to understand the world” – as part of their “Future-proofing Healthcare” series. (More details here: https://somaffect.org/2017/11/future-proofing-healthcare-neurosense-2nd-november-free-event/ )   SomAffect’s Professor Francis McGlone was among the speakers invited Read more…

A Touching Story – BNA Bulletin – Autumn 2017

The Autumn 2017 edition of the BNA Bulletin (free to all British Neuroscience Association Members!) which has just landed on the doormats, in-trays and inboxes of over 2000 people features a 2 page article on C-Tactile fibres, touch, and the work of SomAffect / LJMU Professor Francis McGlone. … “The Read more…

Spinal Column: we all benefit from a tender touch – Melanie Reid, The Times

Melanie Reid MBE is an award-winning Times journalist whose weekly column for The Times, ‘Spinal Column’, is about disability and her life as a disabled person – Melanie is tetraplegic after breaking her neck and back in a riding accident. On November 25 2017, she wrote a column on the benefits Read more…

NewScientist: Premature babies’ brains respond differently to gentle touching.

SomAffect’s research with collaborators into gentle touch in premature infants has been featured in an article by the NewScientist by Linda Geddes. While many premature babies experience pain, McGlone thinks that it is exposure to gentle touch that really matters. There’s mounting evidence that a set of nerves called c-tactile Read more…

New Book: Affective Touch and the Neurophysiology of CT Afferents: 2016

atncta-coverCT afferents are receptors in mammalian hairy skin that fire action potentials when the skin is touched lightly which makes them particularly important in affective touch.  Traditionally neuroscientific research has focused on more discriminative and haptic properties of touch that are mediated by large myelinated afferents and the coding properties and functional organization of unmyelinated CT afferents have been studied much less.  The proposed volume will draw together existing knowledge in this nascent field. Separate sections will address (1) how we can measure affective touch, (2) CT structure and physiology, (3) CT processing, (4) the contribution of CTs to sexual behavior, (5) clinical relevance, (6) commercial relevance, and (7) future research considerations. (more…)

Open-Access & Open-Science (Science 22/01/16)

In 2005, the Wellcome Trust became the first research institution to mandate Open-Access to any publication that stemmed from research funded by the trust. In October 2015 Kate Arkless Gray wrote an interesting article on “10 years of Open Access at the Wellcome Trust in 10 numbers” at the Wellcome Trust blog.

Science20160122Today in Science, Brian Owen’s reports that the Montreal Neurological Institute is going  further still to become the first scientific institute where all research must follow Open-Science principles. (more…)