Pain, the Brain and a Little Bit of Magic

On Friday 29th April at 1:30pm Liverpool Pain Relief Foundation will be hosting an interesting event which is currently touring the region.

PtBaalBoM

Pain, the Brain and a Little Bit of Magic is an empowering performance talk which takes alook inside the brain, exploring how we feel pain, how pain is signalled in the body and how we develop chronic conditions. Based on pioneering research, ‘Pain, the Brain and a Little Bit of Magic’ offers an optimistic message of how chronic pain may be better understood and treated.

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Open-Access & Open-Science (Science 22/01/16)

In 2005, the Wellcome Trust became the first research institution to mandate Open-Access to any publication that stemmed from research funded by the trust. In October 2015 Kate Arkless Gray wrote an interesting article on “10 years of Open Access at the Wellcome Trust in 10 numbers” at the Wellcome Trust blog.

Science20160122Today in Science, Brian Owen’s reports that the Montreal Neurological Institute is going  further still to become the first scientific institute where all research must follow Open-Science principles. (more…)

MRC Grant: How the brain controls our sense of touch.

LJMU’s press office has announced the news of our MRC grant award:

MRCGrantNews181115A three-year Medical Research Council (MRC) funded study (£~700K) is being led by Dr Sue Francis (PI) at Nottingham University’s Sir Peter Mansfield Brain Imaging Centre and Professor Francis McGlone (Co-I) from the School of Natural Sciences & Psychology at LJMU.  (more…)

In autism brains, response to ‘social touch’ is altered

Research by SomAffect’s Francis McGlone appears in this month’s SFARI newsletter.

“The brains of people with autism respond differently to a gentle brush on the arm — a form of social touch — than do those of people without the disorder, according to a study published 5 June in Cerebral Cortex”

SFARI““I find it very exciting,” says Kamila Markram, Autism Project director at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne, who proposed the intense world theory in 2007. The new study supports the idea that sensory overload is a key biomarker of autism.”

Read the full article at sfari.org…

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